This is America

A while back I made a statement on one of my social media accounts stating to be aware of those people who are “Pro-Fetus but Anti-child.”

This particular quote comes from Bakari Sellers, an African-American attorney, political commentator, and politician.

First, let’s be really clear here. I’m neither pro-life or pro-choice. This is a hard fence to straddle because what it all boils down to is what a woman decides to do with her body and what’s inside of her. Women have abortions for many different reasons and quite frankly I don’t think that white males (or any male) should be telling women what they should or should not be doing with their bodies. But these particular people like to be in control so therefore they like to put laws into place that will somehow stroke their little egos. Continue reading

Becoming

Michelle Obama.  Some would say, former First Lady of the United States, but I consider her to still be my First Lady.  Her book Becoming, a memoir which was published in November of 2018 soared past record sales for the year within 15 days.

I chose to purchase the audio version of the book, just because I could listen to the book while at work and therefore killing two birds with one stone.  The book was broken down into three sections; Becoming Me, Becoming Us, and Becoming More.  Listening to Mrs. Obama as she carefully read each word with grace and dignity gave me a much deeper appreciation for her as person and a much clearer view into her life as a daughter, sister, mother, friend, wife, as well as a humanitarian.  Her personal reflections are mesmerizing as she tells her truth as only she could tell it. Continue reading

From the Southside of Chicago to the White House: OBAMA

Hello World.

Today in Black History, lets talk about the 44th President of the United States of America.  Excuse me, the FIRST BLACK President of the United States of America.

Barack Obama

I remember like it was yesterday, the night he won the election and the day of the inauguration back in 2008.  African-Americans really thought that we had overcome.  I can remember my grandmother telling me that she never thought she would live to see the day a black man would become President.  The moment was surreal.  I watched as Mrs. Obama gracefully walked those cold Washington D.C. streets in that lemon/lime green suit.  Mr. Obama strolled with grace and dignity.  For once, we felt powerful and in control.  But how did Obama get to this place?  How did he manage to get into the White House?

Join me each week in a 6 part series listening to the podcast of, Making Obama by WBEZ Chicago public radio.  Here in the podcast they not only detail Obama’s journey but they do a really good job of laying out all the information for us which allows us to connect the dots.  You’re bound to learn something you didn’t already know.  I’m enjoying this podcast because of its focus on Obama’s path from being a community organizer to becoming the President opposed to his life as President.  Which I think we are all somewhat familiar with.

In the first episode alone, we learn about Barack Obama’s confidence, his perseverance, and his desire to help others.  He comes from a Kenyan father and a white mother.  He’s different and he’s a servant.  He truly believes the saying, “You can be anything you want to be.”  The Making Obama podcast is already 2 weeks in; be sure to go and catch up!

President Obama will forever be a part of Black History and an inspiration for all little black boys and girls, now and in the future.

If you’re listening to the podcast I’d love to hear your thoughts on it. 

This post features affiliated links but all opinions in this post are all my own

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My heart is in pieces #Parkland

Last night I sat in bed and just scrolled my Twitter timeline and read all the text from students who sent “I love you” text to family and friends. Not because it was Valentine’s Day, but because their school was under attack.  They were living in the moment of a mass shooter running through their school in Florida.  Pictures showed them on the floor under desk with classrooms being invaded by police. Continue reading

“Keep your eye on the prize”

Today, at work, I’m listening to a Ted Talk Daily podcast by Bryan Stevenson and it was on of those podcast that I felt like I had to share with all of you.

I don’t want to quote the entire podcast word for word, because I feel I would not be able to do it any justice, so if you get a chance, please go to Ted Talk Daily and listen to the published podcast for January 15, 2018 which is an archived publication from 2012.

Here he talks about America’s justice system where he shares some alarming statistics.  He talks about race and how we as American’s do not like talking about our history and have a hard time dealing with the truth.  Therefore we remain stagnant as a nation and individuals in our everyday lives.

He states,

“We have a system of justice in this country that treats you much better if you’re RICH & GUILTY than if you’re POOR & INNOCENT.”

This is something to really ponder on.  I feel that this statement is 100% TRUE but I’m eager to hear your opinions on this.  I also believe we need to have more “courageous” conversations around this topic.  Plants only grow by watering them; we have to stop overlooking our past, water the hurt, and nurture it so that we can grow and heal as a nation and as individuals.

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#JusJoJan